Tag Archives: presentation skills

A Case of the Jitters…?

emotional intelligence anxiety

We All Get The Jitters Sometimes

I had an unusual experience a couple of days ago: I got nervous right before a client presentation. It was more than the typical adrenalin surge that happens right before I hit a stage, or stare into a live camera with a reporter on the other end. This was the real jitters.

The funny thing is that I was on the phone with a friend with whom I’m partnering on this proposal, as we waited for his client to come on the line.  So you’d think I’d be even more relaxed since my pal was there with me. He happens to be kicking-“a” in his own consulting practice, and I have a high degree of confidence in him– someone I’d trust to carry the entire conversation without me. To top that off, the workplace Emotional Intelligence program we’re presenting is so authentically from our cores that we don’t need scripted pitches. Not only do we know our stuff– we “are” our stuff. So what’s to be nervous about?

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The Project Manager as Orator: Top Ten Presentation Tips

Project Management requires a broad range of skills. I joke sometimes that it requires being a “coach, den mother, drill sergeant, teacher, and therapist”—all rolled into one.

In addition to understanding project management methodology and group dynamics, we are often called upon to serve as spokesperson for the team.  We find ourselves standing in front of a room full  of executives explaining the project or requesting funding.  This  adds “orator” to the long list of leadership skills we must command.

Presentation Skills Are Essential

The ability to speak in front of an audience doesn’t come naturally for many of us. It may surprise some to know that I started out twenty years ago absolutely terrified to even introduce myself in a group meeting.  I can attest that training and practice can produce a presenter who actually loves to be on stage. If this is something that doesn’t come naturally to you, don’t be concerned. For most people, it requires training and practice. Continue reading